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A complete listing of the currently available text based and webinar courses are provided below. The listing may be filtered by "Profession" and/or "Categories of Interest" and "Sorted by" alphabetical "Title" or by "Newest" title.

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18153
Not Rated
A Guide to Getting New Patients and Referrals
Faculty: Fady Haddad, DDS
Expiration Date: August 31, 2022
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 550

Every dental practice requires new patients and referrals to remain viable. Methods of gaining new patients and referrals include accepting dental insurance, internal practice marketing, and external marketing campaigns. The decision to accept insurance requires knowledge of types of insurance and contract evaluation. Internal marketing consists of satisfaction surveys, reward systems, and consistent communication. External strategies include advertising, accepting insurance, and social media presence. Technological advances, including automated patient recall systems, should be considered.

Educational objectives
At the conclusion of this educational activity, participants will be able to:

1. Identify different types of dental practice marketing.

2. Evaluate which types of marketing will work for each individual practice.

3. Tailor and implement a marketing strategy and evaluate its effectiveness.

Selection Required to Claim Credit

18573
Not Rated
A Mediator’s DIY Guide to Conflict Resolution in the Dental Office
Faculty: Sharon Dolak, MDR, RDH
Expiration Date: February 28, 2023
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 550

Too often, conflicts in a dental practice are addressed in one of two ways — by ignoring them and hoping they’ll go away (they won’t), or by coming down too hard and overmanaging or firing people, hoping that will fix the problem (it won’t). There are proven methods that can help restore peace and cooperation in a practice. Rescue your workplace relationships, maintain a supportive environment, and prevent future issues by getting to the heart of the matter so that you can have a happier, more productive work environment. This course gives dental professionals the tools needed to resolve conflict and encourage candid communications.

Educational objectives
1. Define conflicts in terms of incompatible needs, goals, beliefs, and values

2. Enumerate the stages of conflict and why people get stuck

3. Clarify the importance of interests (versus positions)

4. List ground rules that set the stage for productive conflict resolution

5. Define the difference between assertive, aggressive, and passive communication

6. Identify the steps of a collaborative, cooperative problem-solving process

7. Empower employees to defuse future conflicts—before they take root

AGD PACE Credit Only

Selection Required to Claim Credit

18132
Not Rated
A Review of Thorough Head and Neck Examinations for the Practicing Dentist
Faculty: Amisha Singh, DDS
Expiration Date: May 31, 2022
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 730

A thorough head and neck examination may arguably be the most important part of a comprehensive or periodic exam and can be valuable in helping diagnose a plethora of disorders, many of which require early detection for effective cure. With high utilization and recommendations of biannual preventative care visits, dentists can be pivotal in screenings and diagnosis. Systematic and regular screenings are key factors. The examination should cover lymph nodes, muscular anomalies or tension, asymmetrical growths, the temporomandibular joint and other head and neck structures, and form and function of facial anatomy. This article provides a thorough analysis of the flow of a dental head and neck examination, recommendations on implementing a more comprehensive exam with consistency in dental practice, a review of the normal anatomy, and methods to identify abnormalities and effectively follow up.

Selection Required to Claim Credit

18152
Not Rated
Abfractions: Taking a Deep Dive into Noncarious Cervical Lesions
Faculty: Lorena Cockley, DDS, FAGD
Expiration Date: July 31, 2022
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 739

There are processes involved in loss of tooth structure that have nothing to do with bacteria, fracture, infection or caries. This loss of tooth structure in the cervical area is sometimes termed “noncarious cervical lesion” (NCCL) or “abfraction.” Other types of NCCL include erosion, attrition, and abrasion. It is important to understand the difference in these terms and to recognize the fact that these processes can work synergistically and etiologies are often multifactorial. The ability to analyze these lesions and identify the causative factors properly is imperative to formulating a proper plan for clinical intervention.

Educational objectives
At the conclusion of this educational activity, participants will be able to:

1. Understand the difference between the various types of noncarious cervical lesions.

2. Cite the general characteristics for abfraction lesions in the general modern adult population.

3. Explore the dental history and the evolution of the understanding of these lesions.

4. List and describe the signs and symptoms of abfraction lesions and the complicating factors.

5. Be able to evaluate and assess these lesions for appropriate clinical intervention.

Selection Required to Claim Credit

19396
Not Rated
Anatomy of a Handpiece: Understanding Handpiece Maintenance and Repairs
Faculty: Glenn Williams, BS
Expiration Date: April 30, 2024
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 250

Today’s clinician is extremely dependent on the handpiece to sustain a smooth-running practice. The handpiece is an incredibly sophisticated device that requires a diligent maintenance protocol to keep it running properly and safely. Routine, repeated heat sterilization has the most adverse effect on the dental handpiece. Perhaps due to this dependency on handpieces, combined with the damage resulting from repeated routine sterilization and the need for consistent maintenance, the handpiece has earned an undeserved reputation for excessive breakdowns. The dental team can keep handpieces functioning smoothly longer, and maximize the return on the significant investment the dentist has made in handpiece technology, through appropriate maintenance procedures. Careful selection from repair options is also required.

Educational Objectives
At the conclusion of this educational activity, participants will be able to:

1. List and describe the major components of air-driven high-speed handpieces and electric handpieces.
2. List and describe the main differences between air-driven high-speed handpieces and electric handpieces.
3. List and describe the signs of failure for air-driven and electric handpieces.
4. List and describe the maintenance steps for air-driven handpieces.
5. List and describe the options for repair/rebuild of air-driven handpieces and considerations in selecting one.

Commercial support provided by Handpiece Express

Selection Required to Claim Credit

18572
Not Rated
Antibiotic Stewardship
Faculty: Amber Auger, RDH, MPH | Erinne Kennedy, DMD, MPH, MMSc
Expiration Date: December 31, 2022
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 730

The inappropriate use of antibiotics has been associated with adverse events that have short- and long-term effects on the patient and society. These adverse events have the potential to burden the health-care system and negatively impact current and future generations. Dentists contribute to more than 10% of all antibiotic prescriptions. Antibiotic stewardship is defined as “the optimal selection, dosage, and duration of antimicrobial treatment that results in the best clinical outcome for the treatment or prevention of infection, with minimal toxicity to the patient and minimal impact on subsequent resistance.”1 The practice of antibiotic stewardship will help dentists prescribe the appropriate antibiotic with correct dose, duration, and timing for the patient diagnosis. Dentists and dental offices nationwide will benefit from the practice of antibiotic stewardship, and the implementation of these practices will likely improve patient outcomes. This continuing education program will provide an understanding of antibiotic stewardship, direct dental teams to the information they need to evaluate their current protocols, and inspire dental teams to practice antibiotic stewardship.

Educational objectives
At the conclusion of this educational activity, participants will be able to:

1. Review the current status of public health problems that result from the inappropriate use of antibiotics

2. Define and explore the concept of antibiotic stewardship

3. Explore existing national trainings, state toolkits, and practice guidelines in general dentistry

4. Apply and evaluate the practice of stewardship to their private practices

Selection Required to Claim Credit

19211
Not Rated
Asthma, Allergic Rhinitis, and Tooth Decay
Faculty: Erinne Kennedy, DMD, MPH, MMSc
Expiration Date: November 30, 2023
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 010

Asthma and seasonal allergies are chronic, yet treatable conditions that have been shown to alter the oral microbiome. As oral health providers, we are called to help our patients cultivate the microbiome of their oral cavity to achieve and maintain health. Specifically, this course will define asthma and seasonal allergies, explain the current treatment recommendations, and discuss how these disease processes and treatments affect oral health. This course also identifies ways that oral health professionals can help patients with seasonal allergies and/or asthma achieve oral and overall wellness.

Educational Objectives
1. Understand the impact of asthma and seasonal allergies locally (for the patient) and nationally

2. Review the current treatment recommendations for asthma and seasonal allergies

3. Compare and contrast how both disease processes and their subsequent treatments can impact oral health

4. Discuss how changing patient behaviors and using innovative products can improve oral health in patients with asthma and allergic rhinitis (AR)

Selection Required to Claim Credit

BaleDoneen Method: Medical Model Emphasizing Dental Health Component in Inflammation Reduction
Faculty: Kriston Reisnour, BSDH, RDH, CCSH, CSOM
Expiration Date: December 31, 2021
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 742

The BaleDoneen Method—a medical model found to be effective in preventing heart attack, stroke, and diabetes—stresses the importance of oral health in the reduction of inflammation and bacterial burden causing vascular destruction. According to several studies conducted by the American Heart Association, periodontal disease presents Level A evidence that it is independently associated with arterial disease. This model challenges the current standard of health care, utilizing a holistic, comprehensive, preventative approach focused on a disease/inflammatory treatment paradigm to achieve optimum health. The philosophy is founded on the presence or absence of plaque (disease) in the arterial wall. By uncovering the underlying cause of inflammation—potentially initiated by the oral cavity—and providing appropriate treatment, the arterial disease process can be arrested.

The BaleDoneen Method was developed in 2003 by Bradley Bale, MD, medical director of the Heart Health program in Lubbock, Texas, and Amy Doneen, DNP, ARNP, medical director of the Heart Attack and Stroke Prevention Center in Spokane, Washington. Together, they created a program of disease prevention focused on eliminating inflammation affecting the vascular system.1,2  Research has shown how important oral health is in maintaining overall health.3 Their program stresses the importance of evaluating the oral cavity for underlying inflammatory conditions. This method is dynamic in nature, evolves as the science and research dictate, and strives for optimum care.

Selection Required to Claim Credit

18670
Not Rated
Bariatric Surgery Patients: Dental Considerations
Faculty: Kelly Divito, BSDH, RDH
Expiration Date: February 28, 2023
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 150, 750

As the rate of obesity climbs in the United States, so does the rate at which people have bariatric surgery. The American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS) estimates that in 2017 alone, more than 220,000 people had bariatric surgery.1 Dental clinicians, whether aware of it or not, have likely treated patients who have had this type of surgery. There is a stigma with weightloss surgery (WLS) that causes some people to keep it private. Unfortunately, presurgical patients are not required to have dental clearance, and they are not educated on preventive dental treatment, including how their postsurgical diet will affect their oral and dental health. This course highlights clinical findings and dental considerations that may present in patients who have had bariatric surgery. The author collected anecdotal evidence through anonymous online surveys completed by postbariatric surgery patients and dental professionals who examine dental experiences from both patient and clinician viewpoints.

Educational objectives
At the conclusion of this educational activity, participants will be able to:

1. Define bariatric surgery

2. Describe the different bariatric surgeries

3. Articulate dental considerations with weight-loss-surgery patients

4. Assess pre- and postoperative dental risk factors

5. Identify clinical signs of vitamin deficiency

6. Gain confidence in speaking to patients about bariatric surgery and dental considerations

Selection Required to Claim Credit

19298
Not Rated
Breathless: Oral Signs of a Silent Epidemic
Faculty: Kathryn Gilliam, BA, RDH, FAAOSH
Expiration Date: February 29, 2024
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 730

This is an exciting time to be in dentistry. Dentistry and dental hygiene are growing as medical specialties. As our understanding of the multiple links between the mouth and the body has increased, our roles have expanded to include comprehensive care of the patient’s whole health. One aspect of whole health care that can have an enormous life-changing and life-saving effect is to screen for sleep-disordered breathing. Breathing is the most essential function of our bodies. Without oxygen, we cannot survive. Yet, until recently, breathing was not considered a part of dentistry’s scope of practice. With the advent of comprehensive health care and integrative dental medicine, focus on the central role of airway and breathing disorders represents a shift in dentistry’s approach to patient care.1

Educational Objectives
Upon completion of this educational activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Identify various types of sleep-disordered breathing
  2. Describe the screening process for identifying sleep-disordered breathing
  3. Appraise the risks of undiagnosed and untreated sleep-disordered breathing
  4. Recognize the signs and symptoms for sleep-disordered breathing in adults
  5. Distinguish the treatment options available for sleep-disordered breathing

Selection Required to Claim Credit

18724
Not Rated
Caries Diagnosis
Faculty: Gregori M. Kurtzman, DDS, MAGD
Expiration Date: April 30, 2023
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 250

Identification of dental caries is the basis of restorative dentistry and key to preventive dental care. Caries has traditionally been diagnosed based on either visual identification or radiographic evidence of decay. Unfortunately, these methods are not definitive until caries has progressed extensively in the tooth. Identification of caries at its earliest stages allows better preservation of tooth structure and improves the long-term prognosis of the tooth. Newer methods and technologies allow for earlier caries identification, allowing better intervention at an earlier stage, thus preserving tooth structure as well as keeping treatment costs lower for the patient.

Educational objectives
​At the conclusion of this educational activity, participants will be able to:

1. Describe the limitations of caries identification radiographically.

2. Describe the limitations and potential problems using an explorer for identification of incipient lesions.

3. Describe the limitations of caries indicator dyes for identification of carious dentin.

4. Evaluate the different technologies available for caries identification and how they can be incorporated into the practice.

Selection Required to Claim Credit

18551
Not Rated
Caries Management and Minimal Intervention Dentistry: A Collaborative Approach (Second Edition)
Faculty: Kimberly M. Parsons, MEd, CDA, EFDA, RDH
Expiration Date: December 31, 2022
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 250

The incidence of dental caries is increasing globally. It is essential that the dental team work together with the patient to manage dental caries throughout the various stages of the patient’s life. Several methods are used within the dental field for caries identification. The utilization of a risk assessment can assist the dental professional in addressing the disease process and recommended treatment with the patient. It is advantageous to utilize a completed risk assessment, along with various caries identification methods, to help guide the patient and dental team in management of early carious lesions. The use of minimal intervention dentistry to address early carious lesions is an integral part of the caries management process and should be considered when devising a caries management plan.

Educational objectives
At the conclusion of this course, participants will be able to:

1. recognize visual and radiographic methods used for caries identification,

2. describe how CAMBRA can assist with caries management, and

3. identify six methods utilized in minimal intervention dentistry that may aid in caries management.

Selection Required to Claim Credit

18669
Not Rated
Caries Management: When, Why, and How
Faculty: Gregori M. Kurtzman, DDS, MAGD
Expiration Date: April 30, 2023
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 250

Restorative dentistry has become increasingly conservative in its treatment of incipient lesions of enamel and dentin. Preservation of native tooth structure improves the longevity of the tooth, and identification at its earliest stages of demineralization allows more conservative intervention. We will discuss methods to treat white-spot lesions to reverse demineralization and prevent involvement of the underlying dentin. Additionally, methods will be discussed for conservative tooth preparation of incipient lesions and better methods for selective tooth removal of affected dentin.

Educational objectives
At the conclusion of this educational activity, participants will be able to:

1. Describe how to treat white-spot lesions

2. Identify what treatments can be employed for conservative caries treatment of incipient lesions

3. Describe treatments that may be employed for root exposure

 

Educational support provided by: SS White

Selection Required to Claim Credit

19135
Not Rated
Carotid Stenosis and the Dental Patient: An Overview for the Dental Hygienist
Faculty: Stacey McKinney, MSEd, RDH | Kelli D. Whittington, PhD, RN, CNE
Expiration Date: October 31, 2023
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 730

To provide the patient with the best possible outcomes, it is crucial that the dental hygienist be able to detect carotid stenosis on a panoramic radiograph. Understanding the pathology behind carotid stenosis, as well as identifying risk factors, assists the dental hygienist with this detection. To optimize care, the dental hygienist must also be able to instruct patients on the importance of follow-up care with their primary health-care provider in a timely manner. It is also important that the dental hygienist is able to provide referral information to the patient who does not have a primary health-care provider.

Educational Objectives
Upon completion of this course, the dental hygienist should be able to:

1. Locate physical landmarks associated with carotid stenosis
2. Identify pathology associated with carotid stenosis
3. List risk factors associated with carotid stenosis
4. Discuss the role of the hygienist in detecting blockage visible on a panoramic radiograph
5. Instruct patients on the importance of timely follow-up care with their primary health-care provider
6. Facilitate a referral if the patient does not have a primary health-care provider established

Selection Required to Claim Credit

19334
Not Rated
Cognitive Bias Within the Dental Community
Faculty: Dorothy Garlough, RDH, MPA
Expiration Date: February 29, 2024
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 770

Cognitive bias is a pattern of thinking in humans that, although flawed, is repeated mindlessly, sometimes resulting in irrational behavior and decisions. Dental personnel need to understand how cognitive biases impact both their patients and their team members. Left unchecked, these automatic associations can cause grave mistakes and injuries, and result in real harm. This course is designed to help dental team members recognize their own biases and see the need to introspect and self-regulate to change them.

Educational Objectives
At the conclusion of this educational activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Identify cognitive biases
  2. Link some of the common biases to behavior in the dental environment
  3. Understand heuristics
  4. Describe questions to challenge assumptions
  5. Apply tactics to reduce unconscious biases

Selection Required to Claim Credit

18676
Not Rated
Contemporary Approaches to Biofilm Management in the 21st Century’s Oral Health Crisis
Faculty: Lisa Dowst-Mayo, RDH, BSDH
Expiration Date: April 30, 2023
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 490

Annual gross domestic product dollars spent on oral care in the US continues to decrease. Concurrently, prevalence rates of periodontal disease and the percentage of dentally uninsured adults is increasing. This public health crisis puts added pressure on dental practitioners to treat patients in oral and systemic dysbiosis. This course will discuss current research trends in biofilm management that utilize the most current technology available on the market. In order to emphasize the relationship between oral and systemic disease states, the oral microbiome states of symbiosis and dysbiosis will be presented along with the role genetics plays in the management of oral health.

Educational objectives
At the conclusion of this course, the dental provider will be able to do the following:

1. Develop a better understanding of health statistics in the United States as they pertain to dental services

2. Differentiate between symbiosis and dysbiosis and relate those concepts to the etiology of periodontal diseases

3. Identify the potential role genetics play in the predisposition and management of patients’ periodontal disease status

4. Utilize the most current dental technology available on the market for biofilm management to promote oral symbiosis

Selection Required to Claim Credit

18938
Not Rated
COVID-19: Part 1—Separating Science Fact from Science Fiction
Faculty: Maria L. Geisinger, DDS, MS
Expiration Date: July 31, 2023
Credits: 2
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $49.00
AGD Code(s): 750

With the rapid pandemic incited by SARS-CoV-2, which causes the disease COVID-19, widespread governmental and societal changes have affected much of our society. Airborne transmission of respiratory diseases has been shown to contribute to community spread of COVID-19 and respiratory diseases overall are common, causing up to 6 million deaths annually.1 While the current pandemic is caused by a virus that is similar to previous viral causes of epidemics/pandemics, it appears to be unique in its characteristics regarding the clinical presentation of the infection. SARS-CoV-2 is a coronavirus, and understanding the virology associated with this particular virus is critical to evaluating the biologic rationale for future interventions. This continuing education course will review the current status of understanding regarding the SARS-CoV-2 virus, its activity with host cells, and potential biologic targets for future interventions.

Educational objectives
Upon completion of this course, the dental professional should be able to:

1. Discuss the current understanding of the structure and function of the SARS-CoV-2 virus.

2. List related viruses and the diseases they caused.

3. Understand the differences in infectivity and viral activity between SARSCoV-1 and SARS-CoV-2.

4. Develop an understanding of the potential therapeutic targets for SARS-CoV-2.

Selection Required to Claim Credit

19038
Not Rated
COVID-19: Part 2—Is There Something in the Air? Aerosols and Infection Prevention/Control in the Dental Office
Faculty: Maria L. Geisinger, DDS, MS
Expiration Date: September 30, 2023
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 148

Dental procedures that employ handpieces, lasers, electrosurgery units, ultrasonic scalers, air polishers, prophy angles, hand instruments, and air/water syringes can create bioaerosols and spatter. Ultrasonic scalers and high-speed handpieces produce more airborne contamination than any other instruments in dentistry, but much is still unknown about the nature and infectivity of such aerosols. As dental procedures and technologies have evolved, the incidence of aerosol-creating procedures has increased. Inhalation of airborne particles and aerosols produced during dental procedures may cause adverse respiratory health effects, including high-consequence infectious diseases (HCIDs) spread by airborne routes. While transmission-based precautions may minimize risk to dental health-care providers, the evidence to support the most effective interventions and the guidance for infection control and prevention in regard to airborne disease transmission is rapidly evolving. During the initial pandemic stages, limiting dental practice and minimizing aerosol-generating procedures was critical, but as the current pandemic evolves, it has highlighted our understanding of potential modes of airobone disease transmission in the dental office and effective methods to mitigate such risks. Going forward, dental health-care providers should be aware of invisible risks within their operatories and stay abreast of evolving infection prevention protocols before, during, and after patient care. This course seeks to review up-to-date infection control recommendations and emerging evidence for ongoing infection control when delivering dental care, particularly in relation to the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Educational Objectives
Upon completion of this course, the dental professional should be able to:

1. Explain the risk factors and basic properties of aerosols generated during routine dental procedures
2. Describe what types of dental procedures result in significant dental aerosol production
3. Understand the types of pathogens and resultant illnesses associated with such aerosols
4. Differentiate between standard and transmission-based precautions and their utility in the dental office for safe delivery of care
5. List infection control and aerosol mitigation techniques that may reduce the risk of cross-contamination to patients and providers

Selection Required to Claim Credit

18972
Not Rated
Creaky Joints and Bleeding Gums: The Interaction Between Periodontal Disease and Rheumatoid Arthritis
Faculty: Maria L. Geisinger, DDS, MS | Katrina M. Sanders, RDH, BSDH, MEd, RF
Expiration Date: August 31, 2023
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 730

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory form of arthritis affecting 1.3 million individuals in the United States. RA symptoms are due to an overactive autoimmune response that leads to joint damage and, subsequently, a significant societal burden related to patient discomfort, declining quality of life, and increased treatment costs. Several studies have indicated patients with RA have a higher prevalence of periodontal disease than those without RA or with other forms of arthritis. Current understanding of the pathogenesis of RA lacks a clear picture of the autoantibody response and its potential initiators. However, specific serum antibodies directed to citrullinated peptides are associated with smoking, disease severity, periodontal disease, and periopathogenic microbiota. Additionally, the underlying mechanisms of bone resorption and synovial inflammation are analogous in RA and periodontitis. These common pathologic processes, shared risk factors, and potential initiating role of periodontal bacteria highlight the need for interprofessional management of patients with RA and periodontitis. This course seeks to improve dental health-care providers’ understanding of the interaction between periodontal disease and RA as well as aid in the clinical decision-making process in caring for patients with RA in a dental setting.

Educational objectives
Upon completion of this course, the dental professional should be able to:

1. Understand the current scientific literature concerning the association between periodontal health and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and discuss the interactions between these two conditions with patients
2. Discuss with patients the common risk factors and potential shared etiologic factors associated with periodontitis and RA, and become familiarized with strategies to treat those risk factors
3. Evaluate the evidence supporting delivery of nonsurgical periodontal treatment and adjunctive therapies in patients with RA and periodontitis and their potential impact on RA development and symptoms
4. Evaluate patients’ risk factors and oral home-care practices while focusing on individualized patient needs and severity of RA disease markers
5. Discuss with members of the interprofessional team about the importance of, and effective methods for, treatment of periodontal disease in patients with RA

Selection Required to Claim Credit

19258
Not Rated
Dental Handpieces: Maintenance, Repair, and Infection Control (3rd Edition)
Faculty: Tija Hunter, CDA, EFDA, CDIA, MADAA
Expiration Date: January 31, 2024
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 250

Dental handpieces have evolved significantly through the years.1 While traditional air-driven handpieces are still preferred by many practitioners, electric handpieces are preferred by many due to the constant torque, reduced noise, and improvements in smoothness of final preparations.2 Regardless of which handpiece is used in practice, proper maintenance and care will elongate the lifespan of the equipment and promote improved functionality. Understanding how to clean and maintain these handpieces and their components properly will help the clinician achieve optimal results. Moreover, it is essential for quality and turnaround times to know when to replace or rebuild handpiece turbines and who to send the handpiece to for repairs. The purpose of this article is to describe protocols for handpiece maintenance, including disinfection, sterilization, and repair.

Educational Objectives
Upon completion of this educational activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Implement proper cleaning and sterilization techniques
  2. Provide proper lubrication of each handpiece and its components
  3. Avoid common mistakes
  4. Provide proper care for a fiber-optic or LED lens
  5. Demonstrate proper sterilization techniques for various handpieces
  6. Discuss handpiece turbines and the factors to consider when repair or replacement is necessary

Selection Required to Claim Credit

Denture Fabrication: A Lost Art (Part 1 of 2)
Faculty: Ian Shuman, DDS
Expiration Date: January 31, 2022
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00

There are more than 40 million edentulous people in the United States alone, many of whom are denture wearers. However, these patients may have worn or damaged dentures and continue to function. This is partly due to acceptance and adaptation of an edentulous mouth and/or past difficulties with new den-tures. Some patients use dentures only in situations where esthetics are neces-sary. Unfortunately, these patients may also go to a dentist who believes that the complete denture is difficult to create and the fully edentulous patient dif-ficult to treat. This course will attempt to educate the dentist and team as to many steps required to treat an edentulous patient with a removable denture.

Selection Required to Claim Credit

18374
Not Rated
Denture Fabrication: A Lost Art (Part 2 of 2)
Faculty: Ian Shuman, DDS
Expiration Date: December 31, 2022
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 670

There are more than 40 million edentulous people in the United States alone, many of whom are denture wearers.1 However, these patients may have worn or damaged dentures and continue to function. This is partly due to acceptance and adaptation of an edentulous mouth and/or past difficulties with new dentures. Some patients use dentures only in situations where esthetics are necessary. Unfortunately, these patients may also go to a dentist who believes that the complete denture is difficult to create and the fully edentulous patient difficult to treat. This course will attempt to educate dentists and teams as to some of the many steps required to treat an edentulous patient with a removable denture.

Educational objectives
At the conclusion of this educational activity, participants will be able to

1. identify current trends in the denture market,

2. identify the various reasons for an ill-fitting denture,

3. discuss the options available for interim denture comfort, and

4. discuss the steps involved in denture fabrication.

Selection Required to Claim Credit

19257
Not Rated
Digit-Sucking: Etiology, Clinical Implications, and Treatment Options
Faculty: Alyssa Stiles, BS, RDH, LMT, COM
Expiration Date: January 31, 2024
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 430

Nonnutritive sucking is a normal reflex in infants up to six months of age. While most children grow out of this habit, many do not. There are several different theories as to why a child may continue the habit. Clinical implications include the development or relapse of malocclusions and bony structural changes, speech and articulation issues, chewing and swallowing problems, airway and breathing difficulty, and more. The severity of this habit and the corresponding signs are dependent on many factors, including frequency, intensity, duration, and the number and position of digits involved. There are several treatment options available, which will be discussed in this course. It is important for the dental care provider to be able to identify clinical signs of sucking habits, determine if and when treatment is necessary, and provide the patient and/or guardian with treatment options, referrals, and other resources. This course will provide the dental care provider with the confidence and knowledge to adequately manage these patients.

Educational Objectives
Upon completion of this course, the dental professional should be able to:

  1. Recognize the signs of digit-sucking habits and explain the potential ramifications
  2. Identify possible causes
  3. Determine when to seek treatment
  4. Provide treatment options, referrals, and other resources

Selection Required to Claim Credit

19333
Not Rated
Direct Composite Veneers: A Simplified Approach (Second Edition)
Faculty: Ian Shuman, DDS
Expiration Date: February 29, 2024
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 250

Direct composite veneers serve as one method for restoring anterior teeth. However, many dentists shy away from this procedure due to a lack of innate artistic talent, lack of experience, past failures, and the length of time needed to complete the procedure. As a result, they opt for laboratory-fabricated alternatives, resulting in deep preparation designs. This course will demonstrate the steps required to fabricate direct composite veneers in a highly simplified manner using veneer templates and microhybrid composite resin.

Educational Objectives
The focus of this clinical study will provide the dental professional with the steps needed to fabricate direct composite veneers in a highly simplified manner. 

  1. Describe the properties of esthetic composite resin
  2. Describe technique differences between direct and indirect veneers
  3. Refer to the history of direct composite veneers
  4. Restore anterior teeth in a rapid manner using the materials outlined with the steps discussed

Selection Required to Claim Credit

18166
Not Rated
Do Impacted Third Molars Induce Anterior Crowding?
Faculty: Staci Violante, MSDH, RDH
Expiration Date: April 30, 2022
Credits: 2
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $49.00
AGD Code(s): 149

Despite the risks associated with dental surgery, each year an abundance of healthy, asymptomatic third molars are extracted from dental patients. According to the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, about 85% of third molars ultimately require removal because of impaction, decay, pain, and/or crowding.7 However, evidence supporting the prophylactic removal of third molars is surprisingly sparse. This course will examine the controversy of whether impacted third molars induce anterior crowding and whether crowding truly warrants their removal.

Educational objectives
In this educational activity, participants will explore the following:

1. Whether impacted third molars are the fundamental reason for crowding in the anterior of the lower arch

2. Factors that may influence crowding of the lower incisors

3. Classifications of impacted third molars

4. Complications of impacted third molars

5. Mesial drift and its role in the dental arch

6. The role of the dental hygienist in problems related to third molars

Selection Required to Claim Credit

Eating Disorders
Faculty: Lisa Dowst-Mayo, RDH, BSDH
Expiration Date: September 30, 2021
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 130, 153

Eating Disorders (EDs) are a growing public health problem with worldwide prevalence. The etiology of EDs is multifactorial with genetic, biological, environmental, psychological and sociocultural influences.1,2 The societal pressures for girls to be thin and boys to “bulk-up” in the United States influences our youth’s perceptions of body image; which relates to the average age of onset for EDs being puberty through adolescence. EDs have long-lasting negative impacts to patient’s health. EDs are a group of psychiatric illnesses and this course provides information based on the new diagnostic criteria from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, 5th edition (DSM-5). This course will focus on the dental provider’s role in identification of EDs, as they are in an ideal positon to help identify EDs in earlier stages, where interventions have a higher likelihood of being successful.

Selection Required to Claim Credit

Ethics Within The Dental Community
Faculty: Dorothy Garlough, RDH, MPA
Expiration Date: March 01, 2022
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 555

The word “ethics” is derived from the Greek word “ethos,” meaning habit, custom, or character.1 It operates from a mindset based on moral principles and virtues of individuals with actions in alignment with these principles.2 Dental ethics revolves around the extent to which actions within the dental practice promote good and reduce harm.3 Harvard University business professor Bill George raises the question, “Which way is true north?” In this analogy, George says that true north is the “fixed point in a spinning wheel, which orients behavior to stay on track.” Beliefs, values, and principles are the compass that directs decisions toward true north, and utilizing mindful judgment ensures alignment.4

Within the dental profession, ethical standards result in moral virtues that enable fair, equitable, and good decisions. This course provides information to help direct dental personnel toward ethical actions and decisions. It also provides documentation on how the public views dentistry as it relates to ethics and honesty.

Selection Required to Claim Credit

18154
Not Rated
Getting Your Fire Back: Burnout Among Oral Health Professionals
Faculty: Erinne Kennedy, DMD, MPH, MMSc
Expiration Date: September 30, 2022
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 770

Burnout has been well documented among students, residents, new dentists, dentists, and among dental specialists. As members of the dental team, we have specific challenges in our professional environment that have been implicated in contributing to burnout. Multiple inventories exist to screen for and identify the early signs and symptoms of burnout. When identified, there is a community of resources to help professionals recover from burnout. The goal of this course is to learn more about burnout among dental professionals in hopes of preventing or reducing the burden on our profession. 

Educational objectives
At the conclusion of this educational activity, participants will be able to:

1. Define burnout in the health professions literature.

2. Identify personal characteristics, risk factors, and symptoms of a person with burnout.

3. Compare and contrast the prevalence of burnout among dental team members and describe various screening tools used in literature and practice.

4. Identify the organizational levers and tools that can be used to create wellness for oral health professionals.

5. Discover resources for professionals who suffer from burnout.

Selection Required to Claim Credit

18358
Not Rated
HIPAA Complexities and Compliance Issues (Second Edition)
Faculty: Richard H. Nagelberg, DDS
Expiration Date: December 31, 2022
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 566

The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) is well known to all health-care providers and everyone who has visited any health-care facility. The need to protect the personal and medical information of patients is the primary reason for the enactment of HIPAA in 1996. HIPAA is very complex, making compliance difficult. Additionally, patient comanagement and communication among a variety of facilities including labs, specialists, diagnostic and imaging centers, among many others, has further complicated compliance across the spectrum of patient care. Companies that facilitate secure communication and assistance with HIPAA compliance provide protection for covered entities and the patient as well.

Educational objectives
At the conclusion of this educational activity, participants will be able to:

1. Describe the basic HIPAA regulations

2. Discuss HIPAA updates

3. Define “individually identifiable health information” and “covered entities”

4. Discuss secure communication among facilities participating in patient care

Selection Required to Claim Credit

19454
Not Rated
HIV in the Migrant and Seasonal Farm Worker Population: Oral Conditions as Early Indicators of Infection
Faculty: Sherri Lukes, RDH, MS, FAADH
Expiration Date: June 30, 2024
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 750

Migrant and seasonal farmworkers are an underserved population with a myriad of health challenges. Mobility, isolation from family, lack of education, and cultural barriers are just some of the issues placing them at increased risk for HIV infection. Because they are often unaware of their HIV status and have limited access to care, diagnosis is often later in the disease process than that of the average infected individual. Some of the earliest signs of HIV infection manifest in the oral cavity, which makes dental professionals frontline practitioners for possible diagnosis, referral for treatment, and educational strategies. Dental hygienists must be knowledgeable of and able to recognize these oral manifestations as well as equipped with appropriate educational materials as they work collaboratively with other health-care providers. Implications for policy development are warranted to aid in serving this difficult-to-reach population.

Educational Objectives
At the conclusion of this course, participants will be able to:

1. Describe the migrant and seasonal farmworker (MSFW) population serving the US
2. Explain the population’s vulnerability to HIV infection
3. Describe HIV-related oral lesions that may suggest HIV infection 
4. Discuss appropriate HIV education and intervention strategies to utilize with the MSFW population

Selection Required to Claim Credit

18918
Not Rated
Implant Impressions: Improving Accuracy and Decreasing Practitioner Stress
Faculty: Gregori M. Kurtzman, DDS, MAGD
Expiration Date: June 30, 2023
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 690

Implants are becoming an increasing clinical treatment modality. As part of the restorative phase of treatment, communication of the implant’s orientation in the arch is required for prosthetic fabrication. Different impression techniques are available to communicate that information, all having pros and cons. This course will discuss those different techniques and the use of verification stents to improve the accuracy of implant impressions.

Educational Objectives
At the conclusion of this educational activity, participants will be able to:

1. Describe the types of implant impression techniques available

2. Identify limitations for the different implant impression techniques

3. Explain why verification stents are recommended and how to fabricate them

Selection Required to Claim Credit

Intraoral Digital Scanning: Understanding Your Next Technology
Faculty: David Burt, DDS
Expiration Date: September 30, 2021
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 731

There have been significant advances in digital technologies for dentistry. This has offered a new paradigm in workflow techniques for the general practice and most specialties. Although digital scanning is not available in every practice, those who do have them understand the true benefits to the patient and the practice. Digital scanners can reveal a positive cost/benefit analysis when compared to traditional workflow methods.

Selection Required to Claim Credit

19398
Not Rated
Is Beauty Truly in the Eye of the Beholder? Evidence-Based Ideal Smile Esthetics
Faculty: Maria L. Geisinger, DDS, MS | Hussein Basma, DDS, DESS, MS
Expiration Date: April 30, 2024
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 780

A smile is a universal greeting and translates into all languages. Smiling individuals are judged as more pleasant and trustworthy, and the act of smiling actually releases endorphins that improve the mood of the person who smiles. As dentists, we are trained to create, maintain, and protect the ideal smile, but what should our goals be in achieving that “gold standard” of beauty? The essential components of an ideal smile involve the relationship between three primary components: the teeth, the lip framework, and the gingival scaffold. While beauty may be in the eye of the beholder, factors that allow assessment of overall smile esthetics include tooth width/height ratio, shape, position, quality of restoration, and general arrangement of the dentition, especially of the anteriior teeth, upper lip position, buccal corridor, visibility of teeth, and amount of gingival display, These factors are considered in concert and usually judged esthetically as a group. It is considered that in the composition of a beautfiul smile, the form balance, symmetry, and relationship of these elements make it attractive or unattractive. This course seeks to present the current data regarding ideal smile components and the differences regarding ideal smile components based upon age, gender, and race/ethnicity to allow dentists to create personalized road maps and help their patients achieve vibrant smiles.

Educational Objectives
At the conclusion of this course, the reader should be able to:

1. List the components of a smile and discuss their roles in optimal smile esthetics
2. Describe the step-by-step approach to evaluating a patient’s smile, including assessing tooth shape/shade, gingival display, and lip length/mobility
3. Understand the role of patient-based characteristics on acceptable esthetics and ideal smile components
4. Discuss personalized treatment options to achieve ideal smile esthetics based upon underlying diagnoses in each patient

Selection Required to Claim Credit

18151
Not Rated
Lasers in Dentistry: Applications and Incorporation into the Dental Practice
Faculty: Gregori M. Kurtzman, DDS, MAGD
Expiration Date: June 30, 2022
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 135

Lasers have become a common device in the dental practice with multiple uses during treatment. These include periodontal soft tissue pocket treatments, gingivectomies and tissue recontouring, osseous crown lengthening, decay removal with restoration preparation, and endodontic canal disinfection. Additionally, lasers provide stimulation for enhanced healing as well as treatment of lesions such as oral herpes and aphthous ulcers. The various lasers available in dentistry have their specific uses, and understanding the types of lasers determines how they may be successfully used and for what applications they are suited. This course will review the different types of lasers being utilized in dentistry and how they may be used during treatment. It will also discuss the effects lasers have on the tissue at which the energy is directed.

Educational objectives
At the conclusion of this educational activity, participants will be able to:

1. Describe the different types of dental lasers available

2. Understand laser energy and its effects on hard and soft tissues

3. Identify what treatments lasers are suited to perform and which laser type to use

Selection Required to Claim Credit

18131
Not Rated
Lip Incompetence: Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment Considerations
Faculty: Angie Lehman, RDH, COM
Expiration Date: April 30, 2022
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 730

Lip competency plays an important role in growth and development within the craniofacial complex. It is an essential component of proper oral rest posture. When lip incompetency occurs, function, growth, esthetics, speech, and breathing can all be affected. Determining the underlying cause is an essential part of properly treating this aspect of oral rest posture. Traditionally, treatment has often included orthodontic treatment for correction of overjet, Botox injections, or surgery. However, the most effective techniques include addressing the underlying cause and improving the function of the lips rather than only addressing the cosmetic appearance of the lips. Orofacial myofunctional therapy has proven to be effective in treating lip competency issues and should be considered a valid treatment option to be used in conjunction with orthodontic treatment, and before Botox and surgery are considered.

Selection Required to Claim Credit

18910
Not Rated
Management of Third Molars
Faculty: Jay Haddad, DDS, MSHA, MSPFP
Expiration Date: June 30, 2023
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 310

Evidence-based factors can aid the dental practitioner in making a more informed decision on whether and when to extract third molars. Understanding the different management options and the factors to consider in predicting eruption helps in decision-making. Possible pathologic sequelae of maintaining third molars include periodontitis and pericoronitis. The patient’s age is a significant factor in deciding whether and when third molars should be extracted. There are also orthodontic and prosthodontic considerations. The most common third molar extraction risks include alveolar osteitis, infection, delayed healing, clinically significant bleeding, and paresthesia. Germectomy and coronectomy are management options for third molars. Classification of impacted third molars helps predict extraction difficulty.

Educational Objectives
At the conclusion of this educational activity, participants will be able to:

1. Improve decision-making on whether and when third molars should be extracted

2. Manage options for third molars

3. Discuss factors that can improve the prediction of third molar eruption

4. Describe the pathologic sequelae of maintaining third molars

5. Evaluate factors associated with third molars that are affected by the patient’s age

6. Consider orthodontics and prosthodontics in third molar extractions

7. Assess the risks of third molar extractions

8. Consider germectomies and coronectomies as management options for third molars

9. Classify impacted mandibular third molars

Selection Required to Claim Credit

18357
Not Rated
Nitrous Oxide: Use and Safety (Second Edition)
Faculty: Ian Shuman, DDS
Expiration Date: November 30, 2022
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 340

In dentistry, nitrous oxide is the most commonly used inhalation anxiolytic and sedation adjunct. It reduces anxiety, pain, and memory of the treatment experienced and is a valuable component of the armamentarium available to clinicians. When used correctly, it is predictable, effective, and safe.

Educational objectives
This clinical study will provide the dental professional with the steps needed to deliver nitrous oxide in a safe and efficacious manner.
After reading this continuing education course, the reader should be able to:

1. Refer to the history of nitrous oxide

2. Understand the properties of nitrous oxide

3. Know the safety recommendations

4. Have the ability to deliver nitrous oxide in a safe manner, and know the contraindications

Selection Required to Claim Credit

Nourishing or Discouraging?
Faculty: Kris Potts, RDH, FAADH
Expiration Date: November 30, 2021
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 130

Some foods and dietary patterns have been linked to an increased risk of various cancers. A direct link between unhealthy diet and lifestyles to cancer risk has been shown, and research on this subject continues. Diet serves as a contributor to the onset of cancer in about 30-35% of cases, yet isolated nutrients play a smaller role than overall dietary patterns. The available data is inconsis-tent for many foods, which further clouds the issue. This course reviews some of the more recent studies assessing diet and how it pertains to the elevated risk of developing cancer as well as prevention.

Selection Required to Claim Credit

18160
Not Rated
Oral Complications of Celiac Disease
Faculty: Kirsten Brancheau, RDH
Expiration Date: October 31, 2022
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 730

Celiac disease (CD) is a serious autoimmune disorder that affects approximately one in 100 people worldwide. Ingestion of gluten—a mixture of proteins found in cereal grains, particularly wheat—causes damage to the small intestine of those with the disease. Left untreated, celiac disease can lead to other autoimmune disorders. In addition, celiac disease has oral manifestations, including enamel defects, increased caries, aphthous ulcers, delayed dental development, and cancers of the mouth, esophagus, and pharynx. Dental professionals need to be aware of the oral symptoms of this disease in order to make appropriate recommendations and possible referrals for diagnosis.

Educational objectives
At the conclusion of this educational activity, participants will achieve the following:

• Describe the systemic and oral effects of celiac disease

• Identify products that are safe in clinical and home use for celiac patients

• Become aware of possible new treatments for celiac disease

• Refer patients for diagnosis if celiac disease is suspected

Selection Required to Claim Credit

19335
Not Rated
Oral Hygiene Recommendations in the Age of Dr. Google: An Evidence-Based Approach for Dental Professionals
Faculty: Maria L. Geisinger, DDS, MS
Expiration Date: February 29, 2024
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 490

 From charcoal toothpaste to oil pulling to “Flossgate,” recent controversies regarding ideal oral hygiene in the lay media have left many of our patients with questions about the best way to take care of their teeth at home. While dental associations, the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the United States Surgeon General agree on the importance of proper self-delivered oral hygiene, there continues to be confusion in the lay media and the public with regard to the role of patient-administered oral hygiene for the prevention of oral diseases. Current recommendations include brushing for two minutes twice daily and cleaning between teeth to maintain a healthy mouth and smile. Furthermore, customization of oral hygiene recommendations for patients based upon their risk profiles allows for optimal outcomes for disease prevention. It is well established that there are over 700 identified species of bacteria and up to 1,500 putative pathologic microorganisms found in dental plaque biofilms. Many of these organisms as well as other factors, including bacterial nutrients, food debris, molecules that facilitate bacterial adhesion and invasion and other extrinsic factors in the environment, and the body’s own immune response, contribute to diseases of the teeth and gingival tissues. This course will review current recommendations for oral home care, discuss strategies to deliver person-centered oral hygiene instructions for patients based upon risks for oral diseases, and review the current evidence regarding oral hygiene practices and/or products.

Educational Objectives
Upon completion of this course, the dental professional should be able to:

  1. Understand the risks and benefits of controversial oral hygiene practices and/or products
  2. List the optimal strategies and rationale for oral hygiene, including toothbrushing, interdental cleaning, and use of dentifrices and mouth rinses
  3. Develop home-care recommendations that focus on evidence-based strategies for oral health and emphasize individualized patient care recommendations based upon patient needs
  4. Discuss the importance of preventive strategies for oral diseases, including maintaining good oral hygiene in order to promote oral and overall well-being with a wide range of patients and interdisciplinary colleagues

Selection Required to Claim Credit

19299
Not Rated
Oral Hygiene: Office and Home Care During the COVID-19 Pandemic
Faculty: Gregori M. Kurtzman, DDS, MAGD
Expiration Date: February 29, 2024
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 010

COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2) emerged globally in the latter part of 2019 and has spread to every country, leading to a pandemic with increasing infections and deaths related to the virus. COVID-19 has an aerosol transmission that causes infection primarily through the mouth, nose, and eyes and is transmitted primarily by the mouth (breathing, coughing) and nose (sneezing). Use of masks when out in public has been recommended, and in some geographic areas, mandated to limit potential contact with aerosol containing the virus in an attempt to stem infection spread. Recent studies have indicated that a large percentage of those infected with COVID-19 are asymptomatic carriers able to transmit the virus to others through normal activities that produce aerosol, such as talking, exhaling, sneezing, and coughing. Viral load related to COVID-19 has been reported to be consistently high in the saliva and relatively higher than found in the oropharynx during the early stages of infection. Patients need to remove their masks during dental treatment, and if the virus is present in the mouth, they may spread it into the room air via aerosol when talking or breathing prior to treatment initiation. High volume evacuation aids in elimination of aerosol created during treatment but may not completely eliminate virus particle spread into the operatory air and hence throughout the office. Pretreatment rinsing with specific mouth rinses has been advocated to inactivate any SARS-CoV-2 virus present in the patient’s mouth and eliminate aerosolization of those active particles. This course will review the various mouth rinses available, and their effectiveness on SARS-CoV-2 for use as pretreatment rinses, and improved home care to limit potential spread of the virus with asymptomatic carriers.

Educational Objectives
Upon completion of this course, the dental professional should be able to:

  1. Incorporate basic practices to limit or prevent COVID-19 spread in the dental practice
  2. Minimize the potential of asymptomatic carriers to spread the virus in the dental practice
  3. Describe available mouth rinses and their effectiveness against COVID-19
  4. Limit potential spread of the virus to those one may encounter when unable to wear a mask, such as fellow home residents, and aid in improving periodontal health in general through incorporation of antiviral oral rinses in home care

Commercial support provided by CloSYS Oral Care

Selection Required to Claim Credit

19397
Not Rated
Oral Lichen Planus: Identification and Management (2nd Edition)
Faculty: Gregori M. Kurtzman, DDS, MAGD
Expiration Date: April 30, 2024
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 730

Oral lichen planus—a chronic, inflammatory, immune-mediated condition—may result in erosion of the oral mucosa. The disease presents in four forms—reticular, erosive, atrophic, or bullous—and typically develops in women in their fifth and sixth decades. Reticular oral lichen planus, when absent of erythema, is asymptomatic and does not typically require intervention. However, there is clinical potential of conversion to carcinoma with reticular oral lichen planus associated with erythema or erosion. This potential requires treatment and periodic reevaluation for tissue changes that may indicate conversion to carcinoma. The erosive and ulcerated forms of oral lichen planus are best managed with topical corticosteroids. Refractory cases are recommended to be treated with systemic steroids or other immunosuppressive medications. Nonmedication-based interventions are also available, but with greater potential for adverse reactions, greater degree of side effects, and at greater cost. This review article will discuss identification of oral lichen planus and its management.

Educational Objectives
At the conclusion of this educational activity, participants will be able to:

1. Identify the clinical presentation of oral lichen planus
2. Identify the different forms of lichen planus and differentiate them from lichenoid reaction
3. Understand how to treat lichen planus and manage patient comfort
4. Identify interventions discussed in the literature that are supported by limited evidence

Selection Required to Claim Credit

18162
Not Rated
OSHA Blood-borne Pathogen Training in the Dental Setting
Faculty: Noel Kelsch, RDH, RDHAP
Expiration Date: March 31, 2022
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 148

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) was developed to assure safety in the workplace by establishing safety and health standards. OSHA ensures workplace compliance through inspections. Working in cooperation with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), it protects dental workers from occupational exposure to pathogens and other health risks in the dental setting. Their ultimate goal is to have employees go home safe at the end of the day. This course reviews the blood-borne pathogen health hazards and the preventive measures necessary.

Educational objectives
At the conclusion of this educational activity, participants will be able to:

1. Recognize and correct occupational blood-borne health hazards in the dental setting;

2. Develop procedures in the dental setting to assure compliance with OSHA blood-borne pathogen standards;

3. Integrate prevention tools that address occupational health risks, including blood-borne pathogens; and

4. Identify and value the necessary screening protocols, as well as health and safety education necessary, for all workers in the dental setting.

Selection Required to Claim Credit

18860
Not Rated
Pain Management for Patients with Chemical Dependence
Faculty: Amisha Singh, DDS
Expiration Date: May 31, 2023
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 340

Opioids have been traditionally used to routinely treat a variety of acute and chronic conditions, but with recent research in and attention to the risk of chemical dependence, prescriptive recommendations and practices have changed. Opioid use and its risks become especially important in pain management with patients who have a history of addiction or other forms of chemical dependence. Science in the field of pain medicine and evidence based practice helps practitioners outline a course of pain management that can reduce the risk of addiction or relapse while effectively managing pain and disability in a patient. A discerning provider armed with the right tools can help stabilize pain in a safe and responsible manner. This course will help dental professionals best navigate the nuances of managing pain in patients with chemical dependence and opioid use disorders by discussing how to identify risk factors and best choose effective therapies while minimizing risk.

Educational objectives
At the end of this self-paced educational activity, participants will be able to:

1. Articulate the clinical differences between addiction, tolerance, and dependence.
2. Discuss the role of dentistry in pain management and opioid awareness for this patient population.
3. Identify risk factors in patients and treatment to note when prescribing pain medication.
4. Discuss use and misuse guidelines for pain therapies used for both acute and chronic pain and discuss alternative methods of pain control that may be beneficial to this population.
5. Review common pain medications used, recognize contraindications to prescribing in patients with chemical dependence, and identify viable pain therapy strategies to use with at-risk populations.

Selection Required to Claim Credit

18909
Not Rated
Practitioners’ Guide to Improving Online Searching and Critical Review of Literature for Clinical Queries
Faculty: Lisa Dowst-Mayo, RDH, BSDH
Expiration Date: June 30, 2023
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 770

Research investigates ideas and uncovers useful knowledge. Research can be corrupted with propaganda or bias, both of which lead to misrepresentation of information. This is harmful to health-care providers who unknowingly incorporate corrupt information into clinical practice. This course will provide helpful guidelines for evaluating research to determine its quality level and provide tools to perform quality searches and synthesize information to transform evidence-based research into clinical practice.

Educational objectives
At the conclusion of this course, participants will be able to:

1. Identify quality studies based on design parameters.

2. Interpret and critically analyze research and become a more informed consumer of information.

3. Differentiate between study designs to determine which ones yield more valid and reliable information.

4. Perform quality online searches to access credible information through appropriate search engines.

Selection Required to Claim Credit

Restoring Endodontically Treated Teeth
Faculty: Gregori M. Kurtzman, DDS, MAGD
Expiration Date: March 01, 2022
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 070, 077

Teeth requiring endodontic treatment need to be assessed restoratively prior to initiating endodontic care. The canals may be identified, instrumented, and obturated successfully, but if the tooth cannot be predictably restored, the clinical success is guarded. Although adhesive dentistry has improved how we can restore teeth, ferrules and posts still are required from an engineering standpoint in some teeth, depending on what remains of the native tooth structure. This course will review the engineering behind predictably restoring endodontically treated teeth, how to assess the tooth prior to initiation of endodontic treatment, and what factors improve treatment success.

Selection Required to Claim Credit

18173
Not Rated
Spotlight on Medications, Remedies, and Supplements: Why a Thorough Health History Really Matters
Faculty: Anne Nugent Guignon, RDH, BS, CSP
Expiration Date: July 31, 2022
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 150

Prescription and over-the-counter medicines, home remedies, and supplements are used to combat illness, provide relief, and support health. The unintended oral consequences of medications and supplements are rarely discussed. Many medications and products have acidic pH levels. Others may be formulated with high levels of fermentable carbohydrates, and some products have both a high sugar content and low pH levels. Caries is a pH mediated microbial infection in which acid production via carbohydrate metabolism damages hard tooth structure. While erosion does not have a microbial component, damage occurs with regular, sustained acid attacks on tooth structure. It is important to understand formulations—syrups, lozenges, hard disks, sprays, gummy chews, gels, rinses, powders, effervescent tablets, chewable tablets, and tablet coatings. The impact of medications, remedies, and supplements on both acid erosion and caries development is important, especially if products are used routinely or multiple times a day. A thorough health history can uncover previously hidden risk factors that can lead to the development or exacerbation of erosive tooth wear or a caries infection.

Educational objectives
At the conclusion of this educational activity, participants will achieve the following:

1. Appreciate how medications can play a role in caries and erosion

2. Recognize hidden sources of fermentable carbohydrates

3. Learn about ingredients and product formulations

4. Discover the destructive role of citric acid

5. Understand why dry mouth increases risk for caries and erosion

6. Compare pH levels of oral moisturizers

7. Know how a detailed health history uncovers dangerous habits and products

Selection Required to Claim Credit

18186
Not Rated
Substance Abuse: Social Stigmas and Patient Management (Part 2)
Faculty: Kandice Swarthout, RDH, LPC
Expiration Date: October 31, 2022
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 344

The stigmatization of addiction can easily lead to making assumptions about patients who are drug users. Dental professionals often associate addiction with a drug-seeking patient, which can lead to a loss of empathy and proper care of the individual. Awareness of the oral and systemic effects of a variety of drugs—including alcohol, marijuana, ecstasy, methamphetamine, and opioids—may assist dental professionals in effectively communicating and providing intervention for addicted patients.

Educational objectives
At the conclusion of this educational activity, participants will be able to:

1. Define the effects of addiction on the brain.

2. Identify stigmas associated with drug use and addiction.

3. Initiate difficult conversations with addicted patients through basic motivational interviewing skills and empathy.

4. Recognize the difference between sympathy and empathy.

Selection Required to Claim Credit

Substance Abuse: Systemic and Oral Manifestations (Part 1)
Faculty: Kandice Swarthout, RDH, LPC
Expiration Date: December 31, 2021
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 344

Drugs and alcohol contribute to the death of approximately 90,000 Americans annually. With the use of Marijuana, alcohol, and other drugs on the rise, dental professionals are at the front lines of recognizing addiction and the oral and systemic effects on patients. When clinicians are trained to recognize manifestations of substance abuse, patient care is improved. Patients have a higher chance of being referred for professional mental health intervention and increasing the likelihood for early detection of drug-related oral cancers.

Selection Required to Claim Credit

19162
Not Rated
The ABCs of HbA1c: A Review of In-Office Diabetes Testing for the Dental Professional
Faculty: Katrina M. Sanders, RDH, BSDH, MEd, RF | Elizabeth Sanders, DPM, DABPM, AACFAS
Expiration Date: October 31, 2023
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 730

Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder affecting an estimated 463 million people or one in 11 adults worldwide. As research unpacks the codependent relationship between diabetes mellitus and a variety of diseases of oral origin, dental providers become an integral aspect to the identification, counseling, and referral of at-risk patients. Moreover, dental professionals are now encouraged to take an active role in the early identification of diabetes through hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) testing, which strengthens a partnership between primary care providers and dental specialists while enhancing multidisciplinary involvement in optimal patient care. This article investigates the risks as well as signs and symptoms associated with undiagnosed diabetes mellitus, the manifestations of diabetes mellitus, and the step-by-step process for integrating HbA1c testing into the dental practice.

Educational Objectives
Upon completion of this course, the dental professional should be able to:

  1. Understand the current scientific literature indicating implications for incidence and prevalence of diabetes mellitus and oral disease, as well as the signs and symptoms of uncontrolled diabetes mellitus in the dental patient.
  2. Review the oral manifestations as well as the systemic sequelae of diabetes mellitus, while identifying the risk factors and potential shared etiologic factors associated with diabetes mellitus and oral disease.
  3. Discuss the opportunities for cotherapeutic management of diabetes mellitus and associated complications, including counseling strategies and guidelines for the implementation of dental services for patients with diabetes.
  4. Identify the clinical provision, indications, and process for gathering HbA1c point-of-service tests in the dental office while utilizing the Code on Dental Procedures and Nomenclature (CDT)-approved code.

Selection Required to Claim Credit

19442
Not Rated
The Dental Practitioner’s Ultimate Guide to Adult Patient Fear, Anxiety, and Phobia
Faculty: Lisa Dowst-Mayo, RDH, BSDH
Expiration Date: May 31, 2024
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 153

The American Dental Association reports 22% of adult Americans avoid the dentist due to fear and anxiety, which equates to one in five.Fifty-nine percent of Americans cite cost as the top reason they do not visit the dentist more frequently. Patient anxiety etiologically can be psychological, financial, physical, or a combination of these. The anxious patient presents with significant challenges to rendering care in the dental environment. This course takes a practical approach in the dental management of fearful, anxious, and/or phobic patients that can be incorporated into even the busiest offices. Multimodal, evidence-based, nonpharmacological, and pharmacological approaches to anxiety management are summarized to assist dental practitioners in successfully treating these patients and improving their oral health and overall quality of life.

Educational Objectives
At the conclusion of this course, dental practitioners will be able to:

1. Incorporate an anxiety management plan that best fits their patient population.
2. Identify dentally fearful, anxious, or phobic patients and apply correct management techniques.
3. Provide more pleasant and relaxed appointments to improve both the patient and provider experience.

Selection Required to Claim Credit

18205
Not Rated
The Down and Dirty Side of Dentistry: Infection Prevention that Saves Lives!
Faculty: Lisa Dowst-Mayo, RDH, BSDH
Expiration Date: October 31, 2022
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 150

Dental offices throughout the United States have received negative press when infection control violations occur. These violations can be so egregious that they result in patient death. Licensed dental providers have an obligation to keep their patients and the public safe while under their care. They also need to protect their own health while working in a hazardous profession with a high risk of exposure to disease, radiation, and other environmental contaminants. This topic is so important in dentistry that many state boards now require an infection prevention course for licensure. This course will explore the current recommendations for personal protective equipment and environmental controls for aerosols, radiation, clinical and housekeeping contact surfaces, as well as waterline maintenance.

Educational objectives
At the conclusion of this course, the dental provider will be able to:

1. Understand the importance of hand hygiene and personal protective equipment that is needed to ensure the safety of patients and themselves.

2. Control aerosols produced during dental procedures based on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommendations.

3. Minimize risk of injury through controlling environmental hazards such as radiation exposure and when disinfecting clinical and housekeeping contact surfaces.

4. Understand the importance of dental waterline maintenance.

Selection Required to Claim Credit

18187
Not Rated
The Hidden Truths Behind the Bottled Water, Sports Drink, and Energy Drink Market and the Threat They Pose to the Oral Cavity
Faculty: Lisa Dowst-Mayo, RDH, BSDH
Expiration Date: October 31, 2022
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 150

This course will discuss the changing landscape of American beverage choices. Bottled water, sports drinks, and energy drinks are increasing in sales each year. People have misconceptions that these beverages are healthier alternatives to traditional sodas; however, many of these substances pose a risk to the oral environment with their acidic nature and sugar content. The dental professional is in a key position to ensure patients are adequately informed of the risks versus benefits of their beverage choices. This course will discuss popular beverage choices and arm the dental professional with the knowledge needed to educate patients on their beverage choices.

Educational objectives
At the conclusion of this course, the reader will be able to:

1. Understand the caries process as it relates to extrinsic acid attacks

2. Differentiate between bottled water, sports drinks, and energy drink contents

3. Be familiar with the oral implications associated with beverage choices and provide interventions to promote remineralization and a homeostatic oral pH

4. Be better equipped to educate patients on the risks of beverage choices as related to the dental caries process

Selection Required to Claim Credit

19369
Not Rated
The Human Trafficking Crisis: Identifying and Reporting in the Dental Setting
Faculty: Kandice Swarthout, RDH, LPC
Expiration Date: March 31, 2024
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 166

Human trafficking is a growing public health and safety issue in the United States. It is the fastest growing commerce in the world with more than 200,000 minors at risk in the US. People of all ages are forced into labor or sexual exploitation through fraud and coercion. It is believed that up to 80% of victims are seen by health-care providers while under the influence of traffickers. These victims will not identify themselves as such due to the fear of being further abused by their traffickers. Currently, only 13 states require health-care professionals to take courses on recognizing the signs of a trafficked individual. As dental care providers, it is imperative to identify the signs and know how to report suspected human trafficking. Through education of professionals in all health-care settings, victims of trafficking may be more likely to be rescued and receive the proper resources for healing and recovery.

Educational Objectives
Upon completion of this course, the dental professional should be able to:

  1. Understand the definition of human trafficking
  2. Learn who is at risk to be trafficked
  3. Understand the difference between sex trafficking and sex work
  4. Learn how to identify a person who is being trafficked
  5. Evaluate the need to report a potentially trafficked person
  6. Understand the procedures for reporting a potentially trafficked person
  7. Use trauma-informed care and apply effective communication skills with a potentially trafficked patient

 

Selection Required to Claim Credit

19039
Not Rated
The Power of a Prehuddle Morning Yoga Flow: How to Implement a Prehuddle Yoga Flow to Reduce Stress and Increase Daily Productivity
Faculty: Cristian Pavel, DDS, RYT 200 | Danielle Cascioli, DDS, RYT 200
Expiration Date: September 30, 2023
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 770

The prehuddle yoga flow is a five-to-10-minute sequence of breathing and movements designed to help release physical and mental tension in order to optimize movement and focus throughout the workday. The goal of this practice is to strengthen overall health and prevent chronic stress. This course will break down each component of the five-to-10-minute prehuddle yoga flow and discuss the purpose and application of each individual exercise. One healthy decision will lead to the next. This sequence is designed to reduce stress and increase physical mobility while facilitating a constructive bond between coworkers.

Educational Objectives
At the conclusion of this educational activity, participants will be able to:

1. Self-regulate energy and focus
2. Prevent chronic pains
3. Prevent chronic stress

Selection Required to Claim Credit

18156
Not Rated
The Taste of Sugar: New Ways to Deal with Sugar and Sugar Substitutes
Faculty: Shirley Gutkowski, RDH, BSDH
Expiration Date: July 31, 2022
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 150

Humans have a drive for the taste of sweet which must be addressed by dentistry. Asking patients to avoid or fear sugar is not a workable solution. This course will take a look at plant-based sugars, identifying the problems with sucrose and fructose, and examining the qualities of exotics like yacon and monk fruit, as well as sweetener alternatives, like xylitol and erytritol.

Educational objectives
​At the conclusion of this educational activity, participants will be able to:

1. Examine current science on fructose, polyols (natural sugar analogs), plant extracts, and their advantages and disadvantages

2. Categorize safe versus unsafe sweeteners

3. Discuss how different sugars act systemically as well as their effects on oral biofilm maturation

Selection Required to Claim Credit

18924
Not Rated
Tooth Decay and Diabetes Mellitus
Faculty: Erinne Kennedy, DMD, MPH, MMSc
Expiration Date: June 30, 2023
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 010

As oral health professionals, we recognize the role that systemic diseases, such as type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM), play in modulating oral health. Specifically, this course outlines the role that diabetes mellitus plays in salivary output and composition and the oral microbiome. This course identifies ways that oral health professionals can help patients with diabetes mellitus achieve oral and overall wellness. Suggestions include increased recare visits, chairside screening for chronic disease and saliva health, and the use of innovative prevention products that improve salivary flow, strengthen the oral microbiome, and neutralize the pH of the oral environment.

Educational Objectives
At the conclusion of this educational activity, participants will be able to:

1. Define and understand the key differences between types 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus.

2. Identify the relationship between dental caries and diabetes mellitus.

3. Understand the role of saliva in the progression of tooth decay in patients with diabetes mellitus.

4. Describe the ways in which the oral microbiome changes in patients with chronic disease.

5. Discuss unique ways to improve the oral health and reduce the risk for disease in patients with diabetes mellitus.

Selection Required to Claim Credit

18185
Not Rated
Vitamins: Some Data and Interactions
Faculty: Dorothy Garlough, RDH, MPA
Expiration Date: September 30, 2022
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 150

Too often, people are unaware of possible ramifications of vitamin interactions. They believe vitamins are innocuous and may not even inform medical professionals of their use. This creates a unique and important role for dental health-care providers because of the regularity with which many people see dental professionals. When clinicians ask poignant and thoughtful questions, they can uncover information that may affect not only the dental health of their patients, but also their medical health. Looking at patients holistically includes not only dental and medical histories, and cognitive and physical notations, but also a list of supplementations ingested. This information gives the clinician a clearer understanding of the full scope of care required for patients and will influence recommendations and treatment planning.

Educational objectives
At the conclusion of this educational activity, participants will be able to

• identify water-soluble and fat-soluble vitamins;

• link the lack of vitamins to disease conditions;

• assess the functions of vitamins;

• alert to some contraindications of medicines and vitamins; and

• learn about common foods that contain vitamins.

Selection Required to Claim Credit

18184
Not Rated
What is Dental Health Informatics?
Faculty: Staci Violante, MSDH, RDH
Expiration Date: August 31, 2022
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 730

Dental health informatics is the “application of computer and information science to improve dental practice, research, education, and management, and it is a subdiscipline of biomedical informatics. Numerous applications that support clinical care, education and research have been developed.”1 Dental informatics is “centered on harnessing technology to obtain clinical information that can be used to improve patient care or support treatment plans.”2 The field of dental informatics is concerned with the interchange of health informatics and dentistry exclusively. Dental informatics is thriving, and the interest within the profession is continuously growing, both academically and among practicing dentists and hygienists. Further, dental schools and dental practices are implementing electronic health records (EHR) systems, and health information exchanges (HIE) are transfiguring the way healthcare providers are communicating and practicing interprofessionally. The demands of federal and state programs to promote EHR adoption among certain health-care providers are also beginning to affect dentists across the country. As a result of these changes, dentistry is engaging information technology to meet its clinical, administrative, research, and educational needs more than ever.

Educational objectives
At the conclusion of this educational activity, participants will be able to:

• Identify dental health informatics

• Appreciate the importance of dental health informatics in dental education

• Understand the benefits of dental health informatics

• Identify the challenges of dental health informatics

Selection Required to Claim Credit

What’s in Your Water? The Effects of Bottled Water on Your Teeth
Faculty: M. Suzanne Mathis, RDH, MS
Expiration Date: October 31, 2021
Credits: 2
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $49.00

Bottled water continues to see growth in annual sales beating out the once more popular choice of carbonated soft drinks. Surveys show consumers prefer bottled water because of taste, quality, convenience, and safety. Many consumers also list bottled water as a healthy beverage alternative. However, consumers are unaware of the potential negative effects of bottled water due to the varying pH levels. Two studies, conducted in 2015 and 2017, tested the pH values of popular bottled water brands. Results from testing bottled water showed a wide range of pH values, from 5.16 to 10.38. These results are alarming when it comes to the possible erosive effects of bottled water consumption on the teeth as well as overall dental health. Dental professionals should be knowledgeable in identifying the early, clinical appearance of erosion to educate their patients of the effects of acidic bottled waters on their teeth.

Selection Required to Claim Credit

18130
Not Rated
Xerostomia: Looking With Fresh Eyes to Reduce Dry Mouth
Faculty: Alisa Cooper, DC
Expiration Date: March 31, 2022
Credits: 3
Format: PDF Text
Fee: $59.00
AGD Code(s): 730

Xerostomia is a term that describes the feeling of having a dry mouth, whether as a perceived sensation or the result of salivary gland hypofunction. Regardless of cause, it manifests as a cluster of signs and symptoms encountered in dental practice frequently. While occasional mouth dryness is normal, chronic dry mouth can have devastating consequences on oral health and quality of life. Dental professionals can have a profound impact on xerostomia patients by preventing and mitigating related oral complications. Furthermore, dental professionals can educate patients on how best to cope with the condition. This course emphasizes clinical presentation, etiology, and available treatments for xerostomia. Also included is a review of popular oral health products—along with patient comments—to help practitioners guide patients through the plethora of over-the-counter treatment options.

Selection Required to Claim Credit